Monday, April 13

A Golden Sky

Spring on the Nickel Plate Trail
There’s a gloss of gold out there this morning. I don’t know what creates it—something to do with how the sun comes up, I guess—but I think it is so beautiful. Duane’s asleep in the house, the cats have been fed and the dishwasher emptied. The laundry’s done. Spring breaks are over and all my family members that were traveling are home safe. I have started a new story that is fun and interesting because I don’t know it yet. I am almost frightened by the level of my contentment. I have a tendency, even though I consider myself an optimist (to the point that I annoy people with it), to worry about the other shoe dropping soon.

I don’t have anything to ask this morning—oh, yes, I do! Just think about this a little and tell me what you think.

My story—the one in its first stages—is, while sweet, not an inspirational one. There is no spiritual or Christian journey involved. But the male protagonist thinks he might be a retired minister. I’ve read several books—yay, Teresa Hill—where this has worked out fine. I’m not—and he’s not—proselytizing, but church is a part of the lives of people I write about. My question is, does it bother anyone when the people in a secular romance are quite obviously Christians or otherwise spiritual? I don’t plan on changing anything, but I’m just curious.

Thanks for checking in. While I’m at it, thanks for supporting the Wranglers—we all appreciate it. Have a great week—no, have a golden week. I wish you contentment, with no dropping shoes.

10 comments:

  1. I like that golden glow of spring, too. We haven't gotten that much here yet, but I know it's coming.

    I don't mind at all when characters are obviously religious/spiritual in secular romances...it's another part of their character that I can get to know.

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    1. Thanks, Kristi--that's exactly how I feel.

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  2. The religious thing is not something I look for, but I wouldn't reject a book because of it either.
    Enjoy your first draft. As far as I'm concerned it's the best part of writing.

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    1. My favorite part is revisions. Thanks for weighing in, Marlow!

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  3. I don't reject a book with overt religious beliefs, though I don't seek them out. If the character or writing grabs me on the first page, I'll continue reading unless the author proselytizes. Then the book is shut without regret.

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    1. I like inspirational books, many of them anyway, but even then I don't care to be preached at. I also like non-inspirational ones that are populated partially by people of faith, because they ring truer to me. Thanks, Ashantay!

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  4. Absolutely, I would never reject a book because the characters were people of faith. Often that's something that is crucial to the story, even if it's not an inspirational novel. I love your characters because they are obviously people of faith, people of principles...a retired minister is intriguing... go for it and see where he takes you. ;-

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    1. It makes characterization a little tricky--yay! I do want my people to be layered.

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  5. For me, it's green. Green everywhere, no gold in sight--unless you count the myriad of dandelions that dot my yard. But in PNW, green drips from the trees in the Spring--especially when it rains and then the sun comes out and gleams through the leaves. Love that!

    And I agree with Nan, the idea of a retired minister is intriguing. And I have no qualms about reading books with faith thrown in--Christian or otherwise.

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    1. Thanks, Margie. We are greening up now, beautifully, but I do love that gold cast in the morning.

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