Wednesday, July 29

The Right Frame of Mind

photo courtesy: Nuala
"art is more than a product of your efforts - it should be about feeling, life, attitude, soul..." ~Sergio Bongart

I love this quote, and it seems to me to go with the picture over here. Because it's all about frame of mind. If you focus on the streets or the clouds in the upper right, it's a rainy day...but if you focus on the center, the sun is breaking through the clouds and it looks as if the day is changing.

To me, art is an amazing painting or a great photograph or a really well made quilt. It is something that I can look at and that might, in turn, change the way I look at things.

Which, I suppose, means the books I read (and write) are, in fact, art. However, if you ever hear me say something like, "I'm an ahhhtist", please feel free to slap me about the head, mmmkay? Back to the topic of art.

There are days when I look at my computer and I am the rainy, slippery street: I need to be avoided. I'm focusing on what is wrong with my book or characters or whatever kerfuffle abounds on the interwebz that day. I'm in the wrong frame of mind. I'm missing that beautiful moment when the sunshine breaks through (a review, a new contract, a kind word from my agent or editor) to change the day.

Those are the days when I remind myself to change my frame of mind. Not to focus on the slippery street of a bad review or another writer whose career seems to be going places faster than my own. Instead of that negative focus, I look for the sunshine breaking through. More often than not, that sunshine is that I get to do this wonderful, amazing thing. I get to tell stories and the stories that I tell might change the way someone looks at their corner of the world. Maybe just for a moment, but maybe, that change will be longer lasting. In either case, I've done my job well.

What is your art? How will you celebrate it today?

9 comments:

  1. Sometimes we are our worst enemy and a change of perspective is all we need :) Thanks for the reminder.

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  2. Hi! Am horning in here, uninvited, because Liz Flaherty often leads me here to see what's going on. I guess writing is my art, although it's hard to think of it as art because the editorial side of my brain has so much influence - is that marketable? Will my editor hate it? Will it upset a reader? I'd like to be above all those concerns, but I'm not. Love the photo. I'm with you on the Cadbury Caramel Eggs!

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    1. We're always glad to see you, too, Muriel!

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  3. I agree, Margie, and it can be SO HARD to see that we need that change in perspective!

    Cadbury's are...so awesome, Muriel, thanks for stopping in! And those *same* questions circle around in my mind all the time. It's hard to shut them off! :D

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  4. Oh, Kristina...we're all having issues this week, aren't we? Well, not Liz or Margie, but seriously... why do writers suffer so much over days where creativity may not be on point. Is everyone always on point? And Muriel makes such a great point about not seeing the art when it is the editor who's doing the looking... Great post!!

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    1. thanks, Nan! Another writer friend of mine (Maisey Yates, who is FAB) said once that comparison is the thief of joy. I think that is true, and I'm trying to be much better about not doing the comparison thing.

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    2. Oh, I love that, what Maisey said--I don't think I've ever heard it before. I hope everyone's issues get better right away and that we all look for the sun breaking through the middle. Great post, BTW, Kristi!

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    3. thanks, Liz! It's a great quote, isn't it? So true!

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  5. I have to agree with Maisey, too. But it is difficult sometime not to do that. Love the post!

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