Thursday, July 19

Welcome Kate SeRine

Join the Wranglers in welcoming author Kate SeRine,whose debut novel, RED (Transplanted Tales, #1) will be released by eKensington on August 2. Kate's a little nervous about blogging, but I can tell by the following post there's no reason for the nerves. I hope you like it as much as I did.

Ten Signs You’re Raising Writers

Let’s face it, kids are sponges. They absorb everything, whether you like it or not. And for those of us who live and breathe writing, it seems inevitable that some of our quirks would rub off onto the children in our lives. But how can you tell if you actually have an aspiring writer on your hands? Well, here are a few of the warning signs…

1)      Your little one likes to put his own dramatic twist on a well-known story because he knows he can improve upon what’s already been done.

Recently, I gave my kids a quick summary of Romeo and Juliet. When I got to the part where Romeo and Juliet died, my six-year-old enthusiastically chimed in, “And then they came back as zombies?” Meet my son, the horror writer.

2)      Your kiddo gets one-third of the way through a movie and already has the plot twist figured out.

My eldest is particularly irritated by the fact that movies don’t surprise him. I’ve lost track of how many times he’s turned to me during a movie, given me a disappointed look, and sighed, “It was that guy.”

3)      Stories about their day are told using speech tags.

I was delighted the first time this one occurred because I honestly never expected to hear a six-year-old say, “And then Trey exclaimed…”

4)      You find scraps of stories jotted down on every bit of paper lying around—and only some of them are yours.

This is a growing problem in my house. I use a 75-gallon storage trunk for my story notes archive, and it looks like I’m going to have to invest in something similar for the boys. Every time I grab a piece of paper to write down my grocery list, I find character sketches, plot notes, or lines of dialogue jotted down on the back. Oh well, at least they come by it honestly.

5)      Your kiddo is completely disgusted with the novel he’s reading because he never would’ve written the scene that way.

There’s nothing more disappointing to a writer than when a favorite author lets him down. It feels like the ultimate betrayal.

6)      You notice the child in your life has been reading your professional magazines.

I’m certain that my pre-teen’s interest in each issue of Romance Writers Report has nothing to do with the steamy covers pictured therein. He’s reading them for the articles. Right?

7)      Your kiddo is your best brainstorming partner.

I have to give props to my kids on this one. They have awesome imaginations and whenever I’m stuck and need to bounce a couple of ideas off of someone—especially if it involves dreaming up something totally out there—they are my go-to peeps. And often these sessions send them scurrying to write down their own burgeoning ideas.

8)      A story just isn’t complete without a setting that pulls you in.

My youngest (the horror writer) loves to thrill us all with his harrowing tales of monster spiders, zombies, and things that go bump in the night. His favorite setting? A dark, dark playground…

9)      You overhear your kids using writer lingo.

Irritated with his big brother a couple of months ago, my six-year-old proclaimed, "When I'm a grown-up, all this will be my backstory!"

10)   And probably the surest sign—they tell you they want to be writers.

I can’t tell you how my heart swelled when my eldest asked, “Mom, when I grow up can I write romance novels, too?”

Now, will my boys end up becoming writers, or will they just be the guys at the office who tell the best stories? Who knows? Check back in about fifteen to twenty years and I’ll let you know. But if they do end up following in my footsteps, at least I’ll be able to say I saw the signs. J

So how about all of you? Have you “seen the signs” in the kids in your life? Have a few signs of your own to add?
You can reach Kate at:


25 comments:

  1. I loved this post, Kate! Thanks so much for coming over and sharing the signs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My pleasure! Thanks for letting me come by to visit!

      Delete
  2. This is a great top 10 list. I have a few I've created related to my daughter. It's amazing to watch your children develop!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They grow and change so quickly, don't they? Every now and then I like to go back through the stories I've jotted down about the kids and laugh over them all over again! :)

      Delete
  3. Kate,
    Did you ever think with such a way with words and vivid imagery that they will be able to talk to women? In fact, they'll have their pick. :)

    Keep their stories too. I have books my sons have written courtesy of a literacy project and they love to read them, especially since they are adults now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! Good point about being able to talk to women--as long as they hold off writing swoon-worthy poetry until they're in college, I'm okay with that. ;)

      And that's wonderful that you've kept their stories! I still have some of the ones I wrote dating back to first grade. My kids got quite a quick out of them.

      Delete
  4. Kate! This is hilarious!! And I can relate. :) I also have two boys and have had many similar experiences. I keep my youngest son's story, "Tales of a Jedi" in my writing notebook at all times. It helps me remember how fun it is to write without limitations or rules (or internal editors ;).

    I can't wait to see if any of our boys grow up to be writers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Lorie! Great idea to keep your son's story in your notebook--I think we all need reminders like that now and then...

      Delete
  5. You must be so proud! :) I have a four year old who HATES reading stories, but loves to "write" them, comic style.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perhaps she will write graphic novels? :)

      Delete
  6. I'm loling, Kate, great post! I'm just echoing you because bebe (my 4-year-old) likes to sit at her desk and scribble while talking out loud to herself about 'and then they do______'. It's hilarious!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should record her sometime when she's not aware and play it back for her when she's older. She'd probably love it!

      Delete
  7. Great post, Kate! I hope your book does well. When my daughter was young, I remember one time she tossed a book aside with a sigh, saying, I could do better than that.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Love the line about your son's childhood being his "backstory" when he's a grown-up!

    I may have to adopt that line myself. Any time I have a bad day, I'll just tell myself I'm building "backstory" for that wonderful triumph in my future. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a great way of looking at the bad days! I think I might post it on the bulletin board in my office as a reminder. ;)

      Delete
  9. Great list! I particularly enjoyed the story told by your son, the horror writer. Get that boy a contract! ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! He has quite an imagination, that one. I'll be curious to see where it leads him. :)

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. Glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  11. ...."and then they come back as zombies?", at least he was listening :-) Very informative and entertaining.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Kate, I'm SO excited to read RED!!! Your voice is amazing and your personality shows through in this interview.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Love it! My youngest daughter has always been an artist, but she draws character sketches and scenes she wants to write. One day, I have no doubt, she'll put the two together. And her imagination--so much better than mine ever was.

    ReplyDelete