Thursday, August 9

Tale of the Curly Sedge

Two years ago I came across a plant at the Farmer's Market called a Curly Sedge. I'd never seen it before and bought it because it was so unusual. 

It's kind of wiry, twisty green spiky plant. I bought it in a 3 gallon container and was told to keep it wet. You water it like a bamboo, keeping the water brimming along the top. 

Well, it was summer and I'm not always good about maintaining my plants when it gets super hot. If I close and I forget to do it in the morning--well, nothing gets watered and my flowers make sad, wilty faces at me when I return home.

The curly sedge didn't fair well that summer and at the end of the summer, I just dumped it under my gutter. I thought well, maybe it will do better with the water rushing down on it.

Fast forward two years and I'm weeding along my patio and I come across this wiry grass. To be honest I wasn't sure at first what it was because they were little small clumps. I just thought it was weird. Then I came across a bigger one with the more distinct the twistys and I knew that my curly sedge had gone wild. And not anywhere near where I had dumped it off. 

Instead of being up by the house, the plant had migrated to the end of the patio and began again. I think the unusually wet winter, spring, and beginning of summer helped. I know you're thinking "unusually wet?" in the Pacific NW. Yes. All the rain you guys weren't getting, we were and it sure seemed more than usual. 

I think the tale of the curly sedge is a lot like editing.  You're going through all the weeds to find the treasures--the little curly sedges. You're surprised because you don't even see it coming, but there they are--waiting for you through the rain and emerging in the rebirth of spring.

10 comments:

  1. The same thing happened to ours! It had died, so Sheri, in a desperate attempt to revive it, planted it out back. Next thing we knew, it had come back, not only there, but in several places in the back yard. The curly sedge is like the " phoenix" of all plants!

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    1. Tara,
      I didn't even plant it. I just dumped it out. Bad gardener! And it's in a couple places around my patio. Maybe more--I'm not done weeding. Ever.

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  2. Love this, Margie! And what a cool plant...I may have to pick some up!

    Last sprint/summer was especially wet for us. I planted pink impatiens, which usually reach about ankle-high. By the end of summer they were thick, up over my knees and so hard to pull out! They didn't migrate, but they did multiply like mad - think I planted 10 and pulled out at least 20!

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    1. Kristi--it's a pretty cool plant and apparently can grow among even the worst soil by looking at my pictures.

      I love the idea of impatiens that are knee high. How pretty.

      Weeds are about the only thing multiplying in my garden this year. Apparently excessive rain is good for this butter-leaf weed and it doesn't just yank out. I have to dig it out.

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  3. Nice post Margie. I used to keep a garden, but this year it's been hell hot. Couldn't stand being out for long.

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    1. Last week we had two days that went over 100 and that was enough for me. LOL. I am definitely a fair-weather person.

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  4. It has been dry, dry, dry here in CO, so don't think this would make it here. But what a great analogy. Love it.

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    1. Thanks D! I've been thinking about if for a while but had to go get a picture or two :)

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