Sunday, August 5

Who's your heroine?

Skyler and Shea Wilson



          It seems I’m always borrowing these days! This weekend, I was reading Celia Yeary’s blog about heroes at celiayeary.blogspot.com and it got me thinking about heroines. I know it’s not a new subject, but I always think it’s interesting nonetheless.
          When I judge contests, I’m notoriously hard on heroines. This isn’t fair, probably, because just as I don’t like everybody I meet, it stands to reason I won’t like all the protagonists in every book I read. I try never to mark down a contest entry because I can’t stand being in the same room with the heroine, but I’m not sure I’m always successful.
          Same goes when I’m reading a book. My favorite writers are favorites for the simple reason that I love their voices; the story is secondary to me. Makes me wonder if it’s coincidental that my favorite authors also write my favorite heroines.
          So what do I want?
·         LOOKS. I don’t care at all what she looks like, though I admit have less patience with too young, too slim, and way beautiful than I do with Alice Average.
·         BRAINS. Yup, she’s gotta have them. She can be learning-disabled, undereducated, culture-challenged, you name it, but if she’s dumb and tries to get around it by belittling others (namely the hero), I don’t want to read her story. I don’t care if she gets a Happily Ever After.
·         SEX APPEAL. If the hero likes her, it’s not necessary to me that every other guy around thinks she’s hot, too. She doesn’t have to have been a prom queen candidate or the star of the season during the Regency or the best cowboy on the ranch while wearing the tightest jeans and shirt. She just has to be the light in the hero’s eyes.
·         MONEY. I don’t care if she has none or a lot, but she has to be able to take care of herself. Even if she’s a trust fund baby, I want her to work for a living because she doesn’t think the world owes her anything.
·         SENSE OF HUMOR. She has one—particularly about herself—or I’m done by the end of the third chapter.
        What about you? What makes or breaks a heroine with you?
        Oh, the picture? Nothing to do with heroines—at least, not yet. Skyler and Shea are two of my grandsons. They’re 16 and 15 and were on a mission trip to Jamaica. And yeah, they’re my heroes.









20 comments:

  1. Awww, yay, Skyler and Shea!!

    Hmm...heroines...all the things you mentioned. And I really, really like it if the hero is totally a weakness for her...

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    1. Yeah, me, too, especially if she doesn't blame him for that weakness!

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  2. Yes a sense of humor and a sassy attitude works every time.

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    1. I like sassy until it crosses the line into meanness--but the sense of humor ALways works for me. Thanks for coming by, Maddy.

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  3. I don't like it if she's too sweet. When she has all the "right" feelings towards situations like truly liking her ex-fiancee's new wife, or wanting to help the woman who wants to ruin her, I just turn off. Either she's a doormat or an idiot, but I just can't identify with a "too sweet" heroine.

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    1. Yeah, and I err that way in my writing, because I tend toward common-sense--and cowardly. I think I write about myself too much! Thanks for stopping, Patty.

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  4. I love it when a heroine maintains strongly held convictions and is not easily swayed by six-packs, or soulful eyes.

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  5. I love playful sparks and an ability to be a partner with the hero, not an adornment. :-) Great post!

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    1. That's important, that ability to be a partner without being less. Thanks, Marianne!

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  6. I love a strong heroine with a sense of humor. Even if the reader can't see it at the beginning.

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    1. I'm with you, Ella. I think those two things alone would keep me reading.

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  7. For me, I tend to write redheaded heroines. Don't know why. LOL But, the characteristic the MUST have is loyalty. If that trait isn't there, I don't wanna know 'em.

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    1. I did that too--I love redhead heroines--then I read an article or a blog that said, basically, "What's with all the redheaded heroines?" and immediately got paranoid and started writing brown-haired ones. :-) I like the loyalty, too, especially if it's a person who's not exactly teeming with redeeming features!

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  8. I like a heroine with faults, be they physical or in her personality. Perfect heroines drive me crazy!

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  9. Sadly, I guess I'm mostly biased towards heroes, rather than heroines-but I need the woman to be someone who truly will be a challenge to the hero.

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  10. Hi, Nancy--thanks for coming by. As someone who's been married to her total opposite for 41 years, I gotta agree about the "challenge" part, though I'm not sure Duane would! :-)

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  11. I think I really enjoy quirky, outspoken heroines. Seems to be my favorites so far, but I'm sure that is always subject to change.

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    1. That's good, because I think it's kind of a trend now. They wear thin with me, but it's nice there's variety out there for all of us. :-) Thanks for coming by!

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