Monday, February 10

Tribute


Did you all watch “The Beatles: The Night That Changed America — A GRAMMY Salute”? Are you old enough to remember 50 years ago last night? Sometimes it’s sigh-worthy being the oldest person in the room—or in this case in the Wranglers’ round corral. I find myself looking around to see if there’s anyone else there who remembers the things I do. I know D’Ann, Kristi, Shawn, and Margie don’t remember February of 1964, but I do. And the memories are definitely sigh-worthy. In a happy, heart-thumping, huzzah! kind of way.
          It was a life-changing time for me. I was 13, not the best of times for most of us. Home wasn’t happy. Puberty was bumpy and painful and full of silent, don’t-look-at-me hysteria.
          And then there they were. Handsome and talented and funny and different. George Harrison, my Beatle (everyone claimed ownership of one) was quiet, and I just knew he’d probably had a miserable adolescence, too.
          So he went with me. When I first wrote romances—though I didn’t know they were romances—George was at their center. My heroes were always handsome, with great hair and cool clothes and sometimes even a British accent. The heroines were always pretty and talented and smart. Everyone always had money and nice houses and convertibles.
          Conflict? Well, no. Motivation? Huh? Goal? Yeah, I had that part. Even then, when I certainly didn’t believe it would ever happen for me, it happened in the stories I wrote on lined paper and didn’t show anyone. After the story had its beginning and middle, it had its end, its Happily Ever After.
          Things have changed in 50 years. I’ve learned about conflict and motivation. My heroines tend to be Everygirl and my heroes are flawed (though they still have great hair).
But I still have a tender spot in my heart for George Harrison. He did for me what romance novels often do for their readers. They provide respite from pain, rest from weariness, and—sometimes—answers to questions they didn’t know they had. Their Happily Ever Afters provide hope in empty places and leave tender spots in hearts that need them.
One definition of “tribute” is that it’s an act to show gratitude. So this is my tribute to the Beatles, especially George. Thanks for everything.

22 comments:

  1. I don't have cable access so didn't see the tribute, but I sure do remember that February night! I wonder what our lives would be like had the Fab Four not been as popular and talented? Thanks for the post, and by the way, George is MINE. (grin)

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    1. LOL. I'll share! His son was on stage for a song last night and it was like seeing George all over again.

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  2. I didn't watch the tribute last night...I think I'm too young to really 'get' the Beatles. I like a few of their songs, though.

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    1. One of my kids is crazy about them--I think it's genetics. :-)

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  3. Liz, I remember. My sisters and I were gathered in front of the TV that night in 1964 to see the Beatles. George was mine too. Everyone else liked John and Paul but George was for me (I guess we can share). It's amazing how one night on television can define a generation.

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    1. It is amazing. I was also amazed at how emotional I was watching last night!

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  4. I wish I had watched, but instead, tuned into the Olympics. However, I will not admit my age, but I did watch. And the most memorable part aside from the jiggy tune was my aunt saying she wanted to switch from a popular show for kids to watch the Roaches. LOLOLOL

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  5. Oh, no... My parents didn't like them, and they were pretty strict, but I did get to see all three weeks on Ed Sullivan!

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  6. Didn't watch. Never been a fan. I loved Paul, later. When he was with Wings. I love watching those old clips of the girls screaming when they got off the plane! I can see you there, Liz.

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  7. Didn't see the tribute. I wasn't born until 1967 so I wasn't a fan. But I think Ringo had such a cool name!

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  8. I wanted to watch it sooooo badly, but my hubby had one DVR/TV tied up with the Walking Dead marathon while I watched the Olympics on the other one. Born nearly 2 years after that momentous day, but I've always loved Ringo:) And liked Sir Paul the best, since I first heard him with the band Wings. Later I was informed he began as a Beattle, ha ha!

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    1. Sir Paul is fabulous, but he's always been my least favorite. There's no denying his talent, though.

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  9. Didn't watch it but am a true Beetles fan. I remember watching that Ed Sullivan show. I was 9. Liz, I can relate to the unhappy home and growing up hysteria. Thank God, we don't have to go back and do it again. I always loved Paul and his devotion to Linda, and the children, but all of the Beetles were tres cool. :)

    Cheers,

    Cheryl G

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    1. I liked their relationship, too. i wouldn't want to do it again, either!

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  10. Well, Liz, I think I am older than you so you are no longer the oldest one in the room! I loved the Beatles but I didn't have a favorite. That spot went to Bob Dylan, who was my hero from the very beginning. Well, okay, Elvis came first, then Bob. But I think the Beatles absolutely changed music. Everything was so la-la until they got into their creative stuff and that's when they got good and they brought a lot of other bands along with them..

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    1. They started a lot and did change everything. I loved--well, still do--Dylan' songwriting and when he was with the Wilburys, but never could stand his voice. I was the youngest of five, though, so Elvis was always a part of my life. :-) Thanks for coming by, Vic!

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  11. My sister called me up on Sunday morning to wish me a happy anniversary of that night, when we gathered in front of our B&W TV, with my father frowning and harrumphing and my mother tapping her feet and smiling. The tribute was excellent and reminded me once again of the Beatles' musicianship and inventiveness. At various times I adored Paul, wanted to mother Ringo (who looks amazing at 73), and was darkly drawn to John, but in the end it is George's beautiful soul that has left a hole in my heart. Though we lived only a short distance from Philly, I was not allowed to go to the concert there. I was permitted to see the Beach Boys (good, clean-cut American boys, you know) at the same venue a week later. Not at all the same thing!

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    1. I was drawn to John, too, and to his pretty first family. To this day, I am NOT drawn to Yoko Ono even though I'm way too old for passing judgments on things I don't understand. But, yes, it was always George.

      Thanks for coming by!

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  12. Liz--I'm with you on George. I was late to the Beatles table as I was raised on Country and Western--which I don't listen to unless forced now. But George's Crackerbox Palace (I think) was one of my first 45's and I listened to it over and over again. I didn't know he was a Beatle at the time.

    I got my Beatles education when I worked at Deli during my college days. My boss was a big Beatles fan and he'd quiz me. I had no idea that they had done so many of the songs that I'd loved--like Lucy in the Sky.

    Although I missed the special the other night as we had it on the Olympics and didn't even check to see what else was on :(

    Good post!

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  13. It is being repeated tonight on CBS from 8:30 to 11:00

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