Friday, May 12

Lessons from the Unemployed

What I’ve learned so far, now that I’m a Lady of Leisure... er, no longer employed:
1)     The dishes don’t do themselves. I knew that already, but was hoping it was some curse of the working stiff. Nope. It’s a universal problem.

2)     I can really get a lot accomplished when that pesky day job isn’t taking up all my time. Good thing, too, because I’ve had a lot of errands to run!

3)     “Meeting for lunch” is now a three-hour affair. Gone are the days I could cram eating and fellowship into a half hour.

4)     I’m far more active on social media. Some might say I’m “wasting” time, but I consider it increasing my presence. Plus, I set up an account on LinkedIn for my job search, and it has connected me to a lot of people for whom I’ve dropped off the radar screen. As a result, many of them are now friending me on my personal Facebook. I have to be active on that page as well (hadn’t posted since 2012 or something ridiculous). I admit I feel rather like the Prom Queen, I’m so popular. *hair flip*

5)     I can still turn a blind eye to the dust bunnies which need vacuuming. Yep, housework is still not my bag, baby. I’m avoiding it as best as I can. Although I will gladly point out how I’ve tidied up some of the messier piles of stuff covering the surfaces. And I'll admit, er, shout from the rafters that I cleaned the bathroom over the weekend. That should last me for at least six months.

6)     I still have to carve out time to write. With all the errands and lunches with friends and avoiding housework, my vision of spending entire days in front of my computer writing my NYT Bestseller has yet to be realized. The problem, as always, is time. Now that I have more of it, I’m eagerly filling it. Unfortunately, I’m filling it with quick tasks that are easy to accomplish and check off so I get that immediate sense of accomplishment.

Therein lies the problem. All the errands and tasks are the ankle biters, stealing my focus and attention away from my writing. Funny how we can claim that our one true passion, goal, and focus is to write, to finish our book and move on to the next one… yet we allow the not-so-important little things get in the way. I’m not talking quality time with the kiddos or family—that’s important. I’m talking the small time wasters. The side trip to the store because I’m in the mood for a new fingernail file. The “now would be a good time to arrange my soup cans alphabetically.”

I need to smack myself on the knuckles and hunker down. What would you do if you had all day to do it?

9 comments:

  1. I'd read all day if I had all day to do it.

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  2. it's hard - you'll figure out a schedule that works for you, though!

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  3. When I first retired, I found out I could waste entire days as easily as I'd previously wasted the seven minutes that were unaccounted for. After wasting a few weeks, that got old--so I got too busy again. The thing I've discovered is that there is no middle ground, so enjoy those three-hour lunches and ignore the dust bunnies.

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    1. Woohoo! Liz just gave me permission to waste my time (for a while, anyway)! :-)

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  4. You will find your sweet spot of using time wisely and also allowing time for the fun things.

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  5. When I have all day to do it, I read.
    I do love the freedom of not having the day job, though (I lost my job in 2012), even if I can't read all day. Means I can go on vacation with Hubby whenever he's available (don't have to work around two schedules). Means I can travel with him if his work sends him somewhere (I really like doing that). I can write anywhere. That's what's really great. FREEDOM!!

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    1. Yes! And I'm not looking forward to getting another job for all those reasons!

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